African Beers

African beers are not considered to be the world's finest. However, there are many types of this beer. Even though they are not widely available in Europe, they are pretty tasty. Of all the beer producing countries in Africa, the most productive is South Africa.

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South African Beers

Even though many of us are not aware of South African beers, the country is a great force in international brewing. South African Brewing, or SAB, has the lion's share of the market. It owns brands, such as, Miller Genuine Draft in America, Pilsner Urquell in Czech Republic and Peroni in Italy.

The main beer produced in South Africa is Castle Lager. It is a pretty generic lager beer, having a heady, light taste. Other key beers in South Africa are the malty, sweet Castle Milk Stout and Lion lager.

There are many other interesting South African beers, like Chibuku Shake Shake. This beer is so called as it needs to be shaken prior to drinking it. It is extremely popular in Zimbabwe, Zambia and Botswana. Another extremely popular South African beer is Laurentina Clara, which is produced in Mozambique. It has won countless awards and is a great Pilsner lager, with a crisp and clean finish. Mozambique also has a great award-winning dark lager called Preta.

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East African Beers

Eastern Africa is not particularly known for its good beer, even though Kenya Breweries Ltd produces one of Africa's most well known beers, Tusker Premium. It is constantly in a battle with Castle Lager to be Africa's number 1 selling beer. Tusker Premium is a lager beer which has been produced with equatorial barley, giving it a grainy, somewhat grassy taste. It is known for having more character than several other African lager beers. There are many other beers produced throughout Eastern Africa.

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Nigerian Guinness

The best known beer in Africa is Nigerian Guinness. Nigerian has four breweries owned by Guinness. The stout produced here is somewhat different to the Irish version. Founded in 1962, the breweries produce Foreign Extra Stout, using a Guinness concentrate from Dublin which has been mixed with local pale beer.

This produces a strong stout, darker and more intense than regular Guinness. At 7.5% ABV, it has a nutty, malty flavour with a somewhat bitter roasted finish. It is very popular in Africa, as well amongst African communities in the UK and across the world and in the UK. It is an excellent change from normal Guinness. Even though it is stronger tasting, it is not overwhelming in its intensity.